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I mean, I love Oliver [Stone], I worked with Oliver, we co-wrote together, and I think Oliver's one of the most talented screenwriters in America, he and Jimmy Toback. Because people don't see me around a lot I'm the source of all sorts of rumor. But the truth is that people don't see you very much. That's not being reclusive, I just won't do that here because you don't get that stupid bullshit over there.

It's just that they're made with a different sensibility. You say that you're out there busy, traveling, working. I was in Lyon, in front of an audience of 6,000 people signing gazillions of autographs, doing interviews with every French magazine, newspaper, TV, radio station that there is.

I think they should cancel the awards and give all the gold to Clint [Eastwood]. It's not about the rightness or the wrongness of the war of this or that. You know, when you're overwhelmed with grief, what can you do? And the people invited to attend are past winners of the DGA Award. Have you reached out to him since you saw the film? So I think I'll simply hold off until I see him in person and say, "Hey, boss, number one." was a big part of my childhood — I have distinct memories of my father being very affected by it. But we were trying something new and which people imitate now, but at that time, nobody had done it before, which is that we opened for two weeks, and there's a limited sale of tickets. And it's a magnificent war story about the war. Those are the people I spend more time with than film people. They'll talk about every old movie that was ever made, know every line that was ever written. I can't retain lines of dialogue from movies made in the '20s or '30s or '40s. When we did , which is quite a long time ago, we had trouble even then finding people who could ...

You know, I just saw it, so it's fresh in my mind. And 'cause it had been delayed, they sent my screeners [to the wrong house]. And I was really, really, really, really impressed. He's a guy who stands by his convictions, and I think the movie also demonstrates that, you know? Though it was characterized in other ways, it's not a political movie. " He said, "Well, it's the Academy Awards." So I jumped in the limo, drove to my house, changed my clothes, went back down, do the thing, next day, get on a charter plane, bam, right back to Montana and start working. And Clint should have been the first person I thanked because without Clint, though he was not directly involved with that movie, I would not have been up on that stage, I would not have had the chance to make . And I've always felt badly that I didn't say, "I want to specially thank Clint Eastwood." And I was doubly humbled by getting one of the statues from John Wayne, who has been a hero all my life with all the great, great movies he's made with John Ford, an inspiration. It was simply a group of people making a communal sound. Every year they have a breakfast in the morning for all of the nominees. He just reminds you that there are real human beings in the film business. I mean, it just opened and it's running straight through. Movies are about people, there're not about ideas. They allude to it, but it's about characters in another situation. I don't know if I'm making myself clear to you or not. I believe Ford was an admiral when he made with Robert Montgomery and John Wayne, Joanne Drew. And if you haven't seen it, you should make an effort to see it 'cause it is a beautiful, beautiful, understated story of the men who served on the fast boats, the PT boats as they were called, you know, that [John F.] Kennedy was on. I mean, you can hardly find a good hat anymore, a good Western hat, a beaver hat, it's almost impossible to find one, or a straw Stetson for the summer. You can't find a hand-tooled saddle in America.

So here was a man who was one of the leading reasons we won, and at the same time saying, "This can't happen again." And I think the apocalyptic question today for all of us is, Where is the next World War going to start? What do you make of these, you know, brutal videos that ISIS disseminates? Well, I don't know if you should be quoting me on this, but it was rather interesting because it was produced by Jane Fonda, who at that time, of course, had made films with Ho Chi Minh and was virulent anti-American. And from what I know about the script, the original script was honest, but I think because of her political stance at the time that she managed to turn it into American guilt, if you like. I know Jon [Voight] was in it, Jon got the Academy Award for it. Well, Dern walks into the ocean and drowns himself out of guilt. It's an apocalypse, cars are blowing up all over the place. Well, it was based on a true story, so you couldn't really change what happened. Or did you feel maybe that it sort of set you up unfairly for your next film? You know, you go out in front of thousands of people. And just packed, I mean the minute they announced it, it was sold out in 10 minutes. It was just, I mean, 6,000 people giving you a standing ovation is quite an experience. at the New York Film Festival, I was most pleased that Kris Kristofferson was able to attend. It was some small little movie, I can’t remember the name of it. I've watched it several times now, happily watched it, and I’d watch it again, especially on a big screen, especially the new version because I don’t know what happened. I don't know whether it was due to the cinematographer messing around in the lab or whatever, but there's a red veil over everything, probably trying to make it dusty or something. And the thing that's the most exciting thing to me is, it was shot over a very long period of time under very difficult circumstances. And that’s the thing, I think for me, which blows me away when I look at it, is how they were all able to maintain their passion, the core of their character.